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Transition is disruptive and may be experienced as chaotic or subtle

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Transition is disruptive and may be experienced as chaotic or subtle, but leads to significant changes in sense of self, perspective and relationships. Old Bill’s challenges and choices in life have led him to where he is today. This is due to the loss of his wife and daughter Jessie which has led him to live a life of homelessness , ‘My wife died one year to the day after Jessie…after the funeral I moved to the carriage. I closed the door to our house, left everything as it was and walked away.’ The use of emotive language further enhances the impact this has all had on Old Bill. Furthermore, the death of his family have made him lose his grasp on reality However, this negative transition in Old Bill’s life has allowed him to reflect and gain new understandings of what he is capable of doing and of who he was before all of this loss. As the text progresses his interactions with Billy have a great effect, encouraging Old Bill to move on and gain purpose in life, ‘I tell him about the cannery and work…I find myself walking to the cannery with the kid looking for work, work I don’t need or want.’ Likewise, Old Bill is becoming fond of Billy as their relationship strengthens and they both provide support for one another, ‘I like the kid. I like his company…for a few hours I almost feel young again…I like the kid.’ The use of repetition reinforces the sense of trust and the bond they have together. It is through his interactions with Billy and his newly found knowledge that Old Bill is able to move on with his life. Therefore, transitions have the power to provoke new thoughts and influence decision making.